Wisconsin Lawyer: Chief justice tells new lawyers, "Be lawyers of courage":

State Bar of Wisconsin

Sign In

Top Link Bar

    WisBar.org may be unavailable December 17th from 5:00PM until 10:00PM for system maintenance.

    Wisconsin LawyerWisconsin Lawyer

News & Pubs Search

Advanced

    Chief justice tells new lawyers, "Be lawyers of courage"

    On April 23, 40 lawyers who passed the bar exam were admitted to practice in Wisconsin. The lawyers were welcomed by the Wisconsin Supreme Court justices, Board of Bar Examiners (BBE) Chair James A. Morrison, BBE Director John E. Kosobucki, and State Bar President Thomas Basting.


    Share This:

    Wisconsin LawyerWisconsin Lawyer
    Vol. 81, No. 5, May 2008

    Legal News & Trends

    Chief justice tells new lawyers, "Be lawyers of courage"

    On April 23, 40 lawyers who passed the bar exam were admitted to practice in Wisconsin. The lawyers were welcomed by the Wisconsin Supreme Court justices, Board of Bar Examiners (BBE) Chair James A. Morrison, BBE Director John E. Kosobucki, and State Bar President Thomas Basting.

    In her remarks to the newly admitted lawyers, Chief Justice Shirley Abrahamson said, "Be lawyers of courage. Courage means standing tall and having your voice heard. Courage means telling a client, or worse yet a senior partner, what she doesn't want to hear. Courage means defending positions of a client that are unpopular. A courageous lawyer aids the underprivileged. A courageous lawyer helps the poor. Courage means not signing a deal when a wink and a nod are required to avoid coming to grips with troublesome issues. Courage means taking a stand. It is often easier to go along to get along."

    Abrahamson also reminded the new admittees of a lawyer's civic responsibility: "Get involved, engage in public service, join community organizations, make a contribution. I ask each of you as a new member of the law community to use your legal trade to make a difference in society."

    Basting urged the new lawyers to accept public defender cases and do pro bono work in their communities. "Unfortunately not all of our citizens have access to justice. You can help assure the promise of our country's founders by doing pro bono work and by qualifying yourselves to take public defender cases. Good lawyers defending our less fortunate citizens fulfill the promise of equal justice for all," he said.

    Justices Louis B. Butler Jr. and Annette Ziegler administered the oath in the supreme court hearing room during two ceremonies. Following the ceremonies, the State Bar hosted a reception at the Monona Terrace, and each attorney signed the supreme court roll that has been signed by every lawyer admitted to practice in Wisconsin since the state was a territory.

    This brings membership to 22,791. Marquette and U.W. 2008 swearing-in ceremonies will be held in May and June.




To view or add comment, Login